Topic: Parent Involvement

Parent Involvement in Education and Parental Involvement in School

in Education / Learning

Websites offer advice about parent involvement in education. Sites contain lists of links that lead to research, journal articles, and statistics pertaining to parental involvement in schools.


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Site offers a substantial amount of technical applied research on parental involvement in schools, including surveys. List of links lead to articles about parent involvement in education, which contain also contain recent statistics pertaining to education.

NCREL presents articles on parent involvement in education in its section on "Family & Community." Series of links lead to articles written for a professional audience, but are useful for parents as well. Articles discuss parental involvement in schools, and offer advice as to how parents can become more involved in their children’s education.

This site offers publications and digests with practical information about parent involvement in schools and their children’s education. Find specific parent involvement topics such as parent-teacher relationships, father involvement in education, and multicultural parent involvement.

This website provides current research and publications from the Harvard Family Research Project on parent involvement, as well as articles that give advice to educators on improving family involvement. Within the section on family involvement are overviews of the current projects that HFRP is working on and ways in which they are influencing family engagement policy.

This website provides current research and publications on parent involvement, as well as articles that give advice to parents. The scholarly research is more geared toward educators, but there are several pages dedicated to helping parents learn how to become more involved in their children's education.

Research on this site emphasizes the importance for parents to develop relationships with the school and community to improve their child’s academic and social performance. This site focuses on low-income families with children in the 5-12 age group.