Topic: Brain Development

Brain Development: Infant Brain Development, Brain Development in Children

in Child Development

A comprehensive collection of resources for information on the human brain, including brain development across the lifespan and early brain development in children. Focuses on infant brain development and the maturation of the brain through childhood and adolescence with articles, facts, reviews, FAQs, and conference information for parents and professionals.


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An extensive library of articles provides information on the human brain, including infant brain development and brain development across the lifespan. Early brain development in children, how the brain functions, and language and the brain are covered. Offers online courses, brain basics and facts, book reviews, conference updates, and brain teasers as additional sources of information on the human brain.

Resources for parents and professionals offer information on the human brain in infants and toddlers. Provides informative articles on infant brain development and early brain development in children in the “Brain Wonders” section with additional topics, tips, and FAQs covered in various other sections.

Research-based information on infant brain development and early brain development in children, mainly ages birth to five years old. Information is geared toward parents and educators and includes topics such as empathy, early emotions and early memory development.

Provides technical, research-based articles on early brain development in children and pediatric neurology for professionals and parents with a basic knowledge of the subject. Includes information on the human brain, child and infant brain development, an overview of the Yale Pediatric Neurology program and additional research topics covering epilepsy, dyslexia, and cerebral palsy.

The NIMH site offers a substantial amount of research and practical information on the full range of mental health issues. Website is divided into sections for the public, practitioners, and researchers. For information on the human brain and early brain development in children see "Teenage Brain: A Work in Progress."

Better Brains for Babies includes resources on brain development from before birth to early childhood. They have easy to read fact sheets, a glossary, links to more resources, as well as links to scientific research articles.

This academic lecture discusses the impact of early adversity on brain development in terms of permanent biological consequences, such as life-long stress responses that can alter our DNA. This type of situations discussed include children left in institutionalized care at a young age.

Dr. Charles Nelson discusses research on children raised in orphanages in Romania, and their subsequent development. He discusses the impacts being raised in such an environment has on the developing brain.

This lecture describes the communication that takes place between infants and caregivers through reading facial expressions. Charles Nelson further describes how the ability to process faces develops in infants using research from the field of cognitive neuroscience. He also discusses face processing in relation to developmental disorders.

Dr. Frank Sharp gives a comprehensive overview of Tourette's Syndrome. He speaks about what it is and its history, possible causes, and prevalence.

Using a developmental approach, Annette Karmiloff-Smith discusses disorders related to the brain and how they can be better understood using images of the brain throughout the lifespan and across specific disorders.

This lecture describes ideas that many individuals hold about developmental disabilities, and then contrasts that information with what is actually known about developmental disabilities based on research evidence. The lecturer also speaks to future directions in research in this area.

This academic lecture discusses the impact of early adversity on brain development in terms of permanent biological consequences, such as life-long stress responses that can alter our DNA. This type of situations discussed include children left in institutionalized care at a young age.